The Mass Graves at Brantford: An Update from the ITCCS Indigenous Elders Advisory Council and Kevin Annett

Posted on June 05, 2012 by itccs

sifting
Sifting for evidence

ITCCS International Communique, 5 June 2012
Brussels

The first successful uncovering of apparent mass graves at a former Indian residential school in Canada began in October, 2011 at the “Mush Hole” Mohawk Institute: the former Church of England (Anglican) facility in Brantford, Ontario.

After being formally authorized by Mohawk elders to begin the inquiry, two teams associated with the ITCCS successfully surveyed the grounds of the Mush Hole with Ground Penetrating Radar. This survey revealed massive soil dislocation in areas where eyewitnesses describe seeing burials of children who died in the Mush Hole.

Based on this discovery, the ITCCS teams sunk two small test digs which revealed positive evidence of burials. These included remains of clothing and buttons positively identified as coming from school uniforms, as well as bone samples which turned out to be primarily animal mixed with probable human remains of small children.

The very success of this dig, and its kindling of similar independent excavations at two other former residential schools during 2012, has sparked a counter-attack by the government of Canada and the Anglican Church which has caused the Brantford inquiry to be put on temporary hold.

This counter-attack has followed the usual pattern of divide and conquer tactics utilizing the already factionalized atmosphere in the Six Nations community in Brantford.

Early in 2012 after the test digs had uncovered the first bone samples, a government-funded operative named Jan Longboat recruited and paid one of the tribal members who had authorized the ITCCS inquiry, Frank Miller, to begin criticizing the inquiry and calling for the expulsion of ITCCS field worker Kevin Annett from the Mohawk community.

Miller successfully factionalized the original group of authorizing Mohawks by stoking fear and spreading state-sponsored smears about Kevin Annett in the community, despite Kevin having been adopted into the Mohawk Nation and given a name.

Nevertheless, to solidify the ITCCS inquiry, in late March, 2012, a new group of ten Mohawk elders and Mush Hole survivors issued a new statement authorizing Kevin Annett and ITCCS to proceed with the Mush Hole inquiry and excavation.

To counter further disruptions and rally native supporters, ITCCS has also established a seven-member Indigenous Elders Advisory Council with representatives from the Cree, Anishnabe, Haudenosaunee, Squamish, Mohawk, Wyandotte, and Maliseet Nations.

The Mush Hole inquiry will be proceeding under the authority of the ten authorizing Mohawk elders, along with a new international team of archaeological and forensic specialists who will seek to recover and identify the remains of children who died at the Mush Hole, for analysis and traditional re-burial.

This inquiry is now joined by similar independent excavations on Cree and Squamish territory, authorized by survivors at the site of residential schools in Ontario and British Columbia.

Obviously, this initiative is a direct challenge to the present state and church-funded whitewash known as Canada’s “truth and reconciliation commission”, which has no mandate to lay criminal charges or search for the remains or cause of death of the 50,000 and more children who died in these schools.

We can therefore expect further efforts by Canada and its guilty churches to disrupt and discredit the independent search for the missing children at the Mush Hole, and elsewhere. And so we urge all people of conscience and all survivors of Canada’s genocide to rally behind our efforts, and to launch similar digs in their own communities.

Mohawk adption

Mohawk adption
Kevin Annett (left) is adopted into Mohawk Nation, Brantford, 2011

Kevin Annett interviewed on ThatChannel about human remains at Brantford Residential School

Real Health 2011-11n-28 – Kevin Annett on Brantford Residential School
http://youtu.be/xw5DwVlaspY

A Weekly Update on the Mohawk Inquiry: The Search for the Dead Continues

Posted on October 17, 2011 by itccs

A second indigenous Nation authorizes digs for their lost children and endorses the ITCCS – The Canadian government strikes back against the Mohawk residential school inquiry, and a long cover-up is revealed.

Brantford, Ontario:

At the start of a third week of an unprecedented aboriginal-led investigation into the burial sites of missing children at Canada’s oldest Indian residential school, more native nations are rallying to the cause of Mohawk elders hunting for mass graves – and the government of Canada is striking back.

A second indigenous group, the traditional Squamish nation on Canada’s west coast, has authorized ITCCS Secretary Kevin Annett to begin surveys and digs for graves of residential school children on their own territory. In a written declaration, traditional elder (siem) Kiapilano stated,

“As the Landlord to the Squamish Nation lands and natural resources, I appoint Kevin Annett Eagle Strong Voice to act with a Right of Entry to claim the said buildings of all the Anglican, Catholic and United churches located on Squamish Nation territory … Kevin is given full authority to access the burial sites for excavation, conduct (of) forensic research as to the cause of death, and provide a proper traditional burial pursuant to Squamish nation ancient ways, and surrender those responsible for this genocide to my people or a public inquiry …”

The Squamish territory comprises all of the present city of Vancouver and its surrounding region, including the location of three former Indian residential schools.

Groups among the Anishnabe (Ojibway) people in central Canada, and the Maliseet nation in the Maritimes, also announced this week plans to conduct their own inquiries into children who went missing in local Indian residential schools.

In response to how quickly the Mohawk example is spreading, the Canadian government has moved quickly to undermine and stop the survey and excavations in Brantford, and continue a history of concealing the remains of children who died there.

After initially supporting the Mohawk elders-led digs and survey at the Brantford residential school site, “chief” Bill Monture of the state-funded Six Nations Band Council announced on October 10 that he now opposed the project, and denied further use of the council’s Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Unit, and the data it had gathered on the school grounds, to the elders’ group.

Monture’s sudden reversal occurred shortly after he was summoned to Canada’s capital for consultation with government officials.

Monture’s band council has a history of concealing the deaths of children at the Brantford school. In 1982, and again in 2008, skeletal remains of children were found on the grounds of the former residential school, but the results of forensic examinations were kept secret by the band council, and the remains vanished.

Meanwhile, the inquiry continues on the site of the Brantford residential school as Mohawk volunteers survey grave sites, take samples and uncover documents indicating that the death and burial of children at the Church of England school was reported as recently as 1969, a year before the school closed. These and other accounts of crimes at the school were deliberately buried by Anglican Church officials of the local Huron Diocese.

“We’re securing another GPR scanner and are going ahead with plans to excavate at the school once an archaeological and forensics team is gathered over the next few weeks. We need the help now of all good people” said Mohawk elder Bill Squire today.

To aid the Mohawk inquiry and its work with Kevin Annett and the ITCCS, contact Squire at 519-757-3624 or Kevin Annett through this website or at 250-591-4573.

Issued by the ITCCS head office, Brussels

Mohawk Inquiry Communiqué No. 3